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BLOG:

Tim Phillips joins iHeart radio and 23andme for Peace Day pop-up episode of the podcast Spit5 Oct, 2018

BLOG:

Justin Dangel, Jeff Rosenthal and Kevin Vilkin Join Beyond Conflict Board of Directors17 Sep, 2018

In The News:

Study: Dislike Is Different From Dehumanization And That’s Important1 Jul, 2018

By HEATHER GOLDSTONE WGBH >
BLOG:

We are the 100%27 Jun, 2018

In The News:

There’s a Distinct Brain Function Behind Prejudice26 Jun, 2018

By TOM JACOBS PACIFIC STANDARD >
In The News:

Suffolk Students Walk at Triple Commencement in Seaport22 May, 2018

BOSTON GLOBE >
Opinions:

Why it matters when the president calls people, even violent gang members, ‘animals’22 May, 2018

By Emile Bruneau WASHINGTON POST >
In The News:

“Each of Us, No Matter Our Calling, Can be Agents of Change and Healing in This World”20 May, 2018

SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY >
Book / Publications:

In the Brain, Dislike and Dehumanization Are Not the Same Thing25 Jun, 2018

READ THE FULL PUBLICATION HERE.

Over the last week, the news has brought us difficult images and sounds: Migrant and refugee children huddled in steel cages. Children and parents wailing as they are torn apart by American agents. Detention buses filled with infant car seats.

Book / Publications:

Parochial Empathy Predicts Reduced Altruism and the Endorsement of Passive Harm14 May, 2018

READ THE FULL PUBLICATION.

Empathic failures are common in hostile intergroup contexts; repairing empathy is therefore a major focus of peacebuilding efforts. However, it is unclear which aspect of empathy is most relevant to intergroup conflict. Although trait empathic concern predicts prosociality in interpersonal settings, we hypothesized that the best predictor of meaningful intergroup attitudes and behaviors might not be the general capacity for empathy (i.e., trait empathy), but the difference in empathy felt for the in-group versus the out-group, or “parochial empathy.”

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Videos:

South Africa’s “Negotiated Revolution” and Mandela’s Legacy16 Apr, 2014

Watch >
BLOG:

Justin Dangel, Jeff Rosenthal and Kevin Vilkin Join Beyond Conflict Board of Directors17 Sep, 2018

BLOG:

Tim Phillips joins iHeart radio and 23andme for Peace Day pop-up episode of the podcast Spit5 Oct, 2018

In The News:

Study: Dislike Is Different From Dehumanization And That’s Important1 Jul, 2018

By HEATHER GOLDSTONE WGBH >
BLOG:

We are the 100%27 Jun, 2018

In The News:

There’s a Distinct Brain Function Behind Prejudice26 Jun, 2018

By TOM JACOBS PACIFIC STANDARD >
In The News:

Suffolk Students Walk at Triple Commencement in Seaport22 May, 2018

BOSTON GLOBE >
BLOG:

All Muslims Are Often Blamed for Single Acts of Terror. Psychology Explains How to Stop It.30 Nov, 2017

By Brian Resnick
BLOG:

The Dark Psychology of Dehumanization, Explained7 May, 2017

By Brian Resnic
Book / Publications:

Backlash: The Politics and Real-world Consequences of Minority Group Dehumanization17 Sep, 2016

READ THE FULL PUBLICATION.

Abstract Research suggests that members of advantaged groups who feel dehumanized by other groups respond aggressively. But little is known about how meta-dehumanization affects disadvantaged minority group members, historically the primary targets of dehumanization. We examine this important question in the context of the 2016 U.S. Republican Primaries, which have witnessed the widespread derogation and dehumanization of Mexican immigrants and Muslims. Two initial studies document that Americans blatantly dehumanize Mexican immigrants and Muslims; this dehumanization uniquely predicts support for aggressive policies proposed by Republican nominees, and dehumanization is highly associated with supporting Republican candidates (especially Donald Trump). Two further studies show that, in this climate, Latinos and Muslims in the United States feel heavily dehumanized, which predicts hostile responses including support for violent versus non-violent collective action and unwillingness to assist counterterrorism efforts. Our results extend theorizing on dehumanization, and suggest that it may have cyclical and self-fulfilling consequences.

Book / Publications:

Attitudes Towards the Outgroup are Predicted by Activity in the Precuneus in Arabs and Israelis25 May, 2010

READ THE FULL PUBLICATION

The modern socio-political climate is defined by conflict between ethnic, religious and political groups: Bosnians and Serbs, Tamils and Singhalese, Irish Catholics and Protestants, Israelis and Arabs. One impediment to the resolution of these conflicts is the psychological bias that members of each group harbor towards each other. These biases, and their neural bases, are likely different from the commonly studied biases towards racial outgroups. We presented Arab, Israeli and control individuals with statements about the Middle East from the perspective of the ingroup or the outgroup. Subjects rated how ‘reasonable’ each statement was, during fMRI imaging. Increased activation in the precuneus (PC) while reading pro-outgroup vs. pro-ingroup statements correlated strongly with both explicit and implicit measures of negative attitudes towards the outgroup; other brain reg

Book / Publications:

Parochial Empathy Predicts Reduced Altruism and the Endorsement of Passive Harm14 May, 2018

READ THE FULL PUBLICATION.

Empathic failures are common in hostile intergroup contexts; repairing empathy is therefore a major focus of peacebuilding efforts. However, it is unclear which aspect of empathy is most relevant to intergroup conflict. Although trait empathic concern predicts prosociality in interpersonal settings, we hypothesized that the best predictor of meaningful intergroup attitudes and behaviors might not be the general capacity for empathy (i.e., trait empathy), but the difference in empathy felt for the in-group versus the out-group, or “parochial empathy.”

Opinions:

Why it matters when the president calls people, even violent gang members, ‘animals’22 May, 2018

By Emile Bruneau WASHINGTON POST >
In The News:

“Each of Us, No Matter Our Calling, Can be Agents of Change and Healing in This World”20 May, 2018

SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY >
Opinions:

Speaking Freely, Listening Deeply14 Apr, 2018

By TIM PHILLIPS BOSTON GLOBE >
In The News:

Inside the Crazy Back-Channel Negotiations That Revolutionized Our Relationship with Cuba9 Apr, 2018

By PETER KORNBLUH AND WILLIAM LEOGRANDE MOTHER JONES >
Opinions:

For Some Muslims Islamic State’s Allure is Meaningful Alternative to Western Values8 Apr, 2018

By TIM PHILLIPS & NIR EISIKOVITS PRI >
In The News:

The “Butcher” Who Became a Peacemaker7 Apr, 2018

By KEVIN CULLEN BOSTON GLOBE >
Read Conference Reports:

Leaders in the Present: Youth Leadership and Civic Engagement in Central America3 May, 2008

Opinions:

Fleeing War, Traumatized Syrian Refugees Need Mental Health Access More Than Ever9 Jan, 2018

By Mike Niconchuk VICE >
Book / Publications:

Motivating the Adoption of New Community-Minded Behaviors: An Empirical Test in Nigeria11 Sep, 2017

READ THE FULL PUBLICATION.

Social scientists have long sought to explain why people donate resources for the good of a community. Existing explanations do not fully account for why people adopt novel community-minded behaviors, which may carry special costs and risks. In a field experiment in Nigeria, we tested two campaigns that encouraged people to try reporting corruption by text message. Psychological theories about how to shift perceived norms and how to channel behavioral momentum drove the design of each campaign. The first, a film featuring actors reporting corruption and the second, a mass text message reducing the effort required to report, caused a total of 1,181 people in 106 communities to text, including 241 people who sent concrete corruption reports. Psychological theories of social norms and behavior change can illuminate the early stages of the evolution of cooperation and collective action.

Videos:

How Do You Build More Inclusive Communities? MW17 Keynote with Tim Phillips16 May, 2017

Watch >
Videos:

Building an Inclusive Baltimore: A New Lens for Inclusion at The Baltimore Museum of Art9 May, 2017

Watch >
In The News:

Our Brains on Conflict: Trauma, Healing, and the Politics of Fear: An Interview with Mike Niconchuk1 Feb, 2017

Europe Now >
Opinions:

Though The Heavens May Fall: It’s Time To Recognize The Armenian Genocide22 Jun, 2016

By TIM PHILLIPS & NIR EISIKOVITS WBUR >
In The News:

It’s All In Our Heads23 Feb, 2016

By SARAH BALDWIN MIT NEWS >
Videos:

The neuroscience of social conflict | Tim Phillips | TEDxBoston5 Nov, 2015

Watch >
In The News:

Fidel Castro Has Died: Here’s an Inside Look at Cuba’s Crazy Back-Channel Negotiations with Obama30 Sep, 2015

By Peter Kornbluh and William Leogrande Motherjones >
Opinions:

A Searing Image, And The Surprising Truth About Empathy16 Sep, 2015

By TIM PHILLIPS WBUR >
Opinions:

Why Are Young Westerners Drawn To Terrorist Organizations Like ISIS.10 Sep, 2015

By Omar Sultan Haque, Jihye Choi, Tim Phillips and Harold Bursztajn Psychiatric Times >
Videos:

“Moving Beyond Conflict” – Timothy Phillips25 Aug, 2015

Watch >
Opinions:

Newton’s First Law of Refuge26 Jun, 2015

By Mike Niconchuk Between Borders International >
Opinions:

Turning into Butterflies: A Syrian’s Reflection on Dispair and Disgrace26 Jun, 2015

By Mike Niconchuk and Mohammad Kheir Between Borders International >
In The News:

MRIs for a More Peaceful World1 Jun, 2015

By LIZ KARAGIANIS SPECTRUM >
In The News:

Melissa Nobles Named Dean of SHASS21 May, 2015

By Peter Dizikes MIT News >
In The News:

Spies, Artificial Insemination and the Pope: How Cuba Came in from the Cold26 Apr, 2015

By DAN ROBERTS THE GUARDIAN >
In The News:

The Brain’s Empathy Gap19 Mar, 2015

By JENEEN INTERLANDI NEW YORK TIMES >
In The News:

How Neuroscience is Offering Hope for a More Peaceful World4 Mar, 2015

By MICHELLE BOORSTEIN WASHINGTON POST >
In The News:

From San Salvador to South Africa, Reaching Conflict by Sharing Experiences: An Interview with Tim Phillips1 Mar, 2015

By TIM PHILLIPS SOLUTIONS JOURNAL >
Read Conference Reports:

Neuroscience and Peacebuilding: Reframing How We Think About Conflict and Prejudice21 Jan, 2015

In The News:

Diplomatic Core1 Jan, 2015

By RENEE GRAHAM SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY ALUMNI MAGAZINE >
In The News:

Cardinal O’Malley Hails US-Cuba Thaw, Pope’s Role19 Dec, 2014

BOSTON GLOBE >
In The News:

Pope Francis Helped Broker the Restoration of US-Cuba Relations17 Dec, 2014

By Crux, Boston Globe THE BOSTON GLOBE >
In The News:

From San Salvador to South Africa, Reaching Conflict by Sharing Experiences: An Interview with Tim Phillips1 Nov, 2014

By Christina Asquith Solutions Journal >
In The News:

Can Neuroscience Help Us Understand Conflict Resolution?2 Oct, 2014

By RADIO BOSTON WBUR >
Opinions:

For Some Muslim Youth, Islamic State’s Allure is a Meaningful Alternative to Western Values18 Jul, 2014

By Timonthy Phillips and Nir Eisikovits PRI >
Videos:

Beyond Conflict Book Launch30 Jun, 2014

Watch >
Read Conference Reports:

Norms, Narratives and Neurons: The Neuroscience and Social Conflict Initiative15 Mar, 2014

Opinions:

Peace in Syria is Still Possible, if Only We Listen to Others Who Have Achieved It20 Feb, 2014

By TIM PHILLIPS THE GUARDIAN >
Opinions:

Finding Peace in Northern Ireland16 Feb, 2014

By TIM PHILLIPS WBUR >
Videos:

Lessons of Mandela’s legacy22 Jan, 2014

Watch >
Opinions:

In Gun Control Debate, Sacred Values Often Forgotten8 Jan, 2014

By TIM PHILLIPS PRI >
Videos:

Making Peace in South Africa30 Jun, 2013

Watch >
Read Conference Reports:

Dehumanization in Conflict16 Feb, 2013

Opinions:

Re-understanding Violence as We Had to Re-Understand Plague… To Cure It19 Jun, 2012

By Gary Slutkin Huffington Post >
Read Conference Reports:

Neuroscience and Social Conflict: Identifying New Approaches for the 21st Century9 Feb, 2012

Opinions:

Is the Status Quo Progress?3 Mar, 2011

By Ina Breuer and Bruce Hitchner European Voice >
Book / Publications:

How ‘Transitions’ Reshaped Human Rights: A Conceptual History of Transitional Justice31 Oct, 2009

Paige Arthur, Human Rights Quarterly 31 (2009) 321-367

READ THE FULL PUBLICATION.

This article clarifies the origins of the field of transitional justice and its preliminary conceptual boundaries. I argue that the field began to emerge in the late 1980s, as a consequence of new practical conditions that human rights activists faced in countries such as Argentina, where authoritarian regimes had been replaced by more democratic ones. The turn away from “naming and shaming” and toward accountability for past abuse among human rights activists was taken up at the international level, where the focus on political change as “transition to democracy” helped to legitimate those claims to justice that prioritized legal-institutional reforms and responses—such as punishing leaders, vetting abusive security forces, and replacing state secrecy with truth and transparency—over other claims to justice that were oriented toward social justice and redistribution. I end by discussing the many ways in which these initial conceptual boundaries have since been tested and expanded.

In The News:

Luers Decries Iran Sanctions29 Sep, 2009

Tufts Daily >
In The News:

Nobel Laureate Refused Offer of Help From IRA4 Mar, 2009

Irish Times >
In The News:

Former Congressman Expounds on Conflict Resolution5 Feb, 2009

Tufts Daily >
In The News:

Central American Youth Leaders1 Oct, 2008

Panorama Youth Leaders, America’s Quarterly >
Videos:

CNN en Español: Young Leaders (and Araceli) in Guatemala4 Jun, 2008

Watch >
Videos:

Fleeing the Fighting: Refugees Traumatized by Islamic State6 Mar, 2008

Watch >
In The News:

Dureza to Share RP Insights in Peace Work in Colombia14 Aug, 2007

Philippines News Agency >
In The News:

Peace Ambassadors At Students’ Behest, Central American Leaders Talk1 May, 2006

By Michele Gouvela Tufts University >
Book / Publications:

Article Summary of “Justice in Times of Transition”2 Dec, 2005

READ THE FULL PUBLICATION.

In recent times a number of totalitarian regimes have collapsed or been overthrown, and have been replaced by more democratic governments. These new governments are then faced with issues of transitional justice. Transitional justice refers to the new government’s attempts to address injustices perpetrated under the old regime. New governments must decide how and to what extent past injustices should be acknowledged. They must also decide who should be held accountable for past injustices, or whether anyone should be held accountable.

In addition to issues of transitional justice, new democracies face a number of challenges. The new government often faces a situation where civil society is virtually absent, having been destroyed by years of repression. There may be little public understanding of democratic principles, such as the rule of law. The civilian government may be faced with a powerful and possibly antagonistic military, and with severe economic problems.

In The News:

International Public Service Key to Chayes Fellowships27 May, 2004

Harvard Gazette Archives >
Read Conference Reports:

Crafting Strategies for Negotiation1 Dec, 2003

Read Conference Reports:

Working Together for Sustainable Peace: The Challenges For Community And Political Action1 Dec, 2003

Read Conference Reports:

Seminars on Social Action and Peace-Building1 Jun, 2003

In The News:

Harvard Project on Justice to Co-Sponsor Peace Program7 Mar, 2002

Harvard Gazette Archives >
Opinions:

Seminar in the Sand: An Emotional Seminar in Gaza Reminds Me of My Solidarity Days20 Oct, 2000

By Konstanty Gebert Prospect Magazine >
In The News:

Justice for All1 Sep, 2000

By Barbara Beckwith Harvard Magazine >
In The News:

Project Aids Countries in Transition18 Jul, 2000

By Julia Collins Harvard Law Bulletin >
In The News:

University-Wide Initiative Gives Peace a Chance1 Jun, 2000

By Ken Gewertz Harvard Gazette >
Opinions:

Justice After Transition: On the Choices Successor Elites Make in Dealing with the Past26 Jun, 1994

By Luc Huyse
Read Conference Reports:

Truth and Justice: The Delicate Balance1 Oct, 1992

Book / Publications:

Beyond Conflict, 25+ Years of Putting Experience to Work for Peace1 Jan, 2013

HOW DO WARS END?

Why are some societies capable of peaceful political transitions while others descend into violence? In this compelling narrative, Tim Phillips draws from 20 years experience on the front lines of peace negotiations around the world to offer lessons for our current foreign policy challenges. The book features stories from six experienced leaders, each from a different country: former Czechoslovakia, South Africa, Guatemala, Northern Ireland, Israel/Palestine and Chile. They were asked a simple yet critical question: What does it take to make peace with your enemy and reconcile your society? Students and practitioners alike will learn valuable lessons from these leaders who were directly involved in peace processes.

EXPLORE THE BOOK HERE.

READ THE FULL BOOK HERE.

Reviews
“By bringing leaders together who can share their own experiences of crossing the divide of hatred and entrenched conflict with politicians and fighters still struggling to find peace, Beyond Conflict has lit a path of hope and possibility out of rage, violence, and despair… valuable for practitioners, teachers, activists, and engaged citizens.”– Dr. Anne Marie Slaughter, former Princeton University dean of the Woodrow Wilson school of Public and International Affairs.
– Dr. Anne Marie Slaughter, former Princeton University dean of the Woodrow Wilson school of Public and International Affairs.
“Beyond Conflict is hopeful and pragmatic as it presents creative solutions, and honest in its acknowledgment of the difficulties in implementing them. An engaging book from an organization with an important, hopeful story to share.”— Kirkus Reviews
“Beyond Conflict: 20 Years of Putting Experience to Work For Peace is a critically important and highly advised addition to both community and academic library collections.” — Midwest Book Review
“In wonderful often first-person stories (and gorgeous photography) documenting its inspiring twenty year journey, Beyond Conflict overflows with both unfailing optimism that the most difficult global conflicts can be resolved, and hard-nosed, cool-headed realism about specifically what it takes to actually do so. The book gives me hope that peace is possible even in the most seemingly intractable struggles.” – Marty Linsky, Faculty, Harvard Kennedy School and Co-Founder/Principal, Cambridge Leadership Associates
“Illuminating. As a war correspondent who has covered many of the conflicts described in this book, I can attest that BEYOND CONFLICT offers a deeply insightful, accurate, grounded and inspiring account of conflict resolution. A must read for journalists, students and anyone working on international issues.” – Janine DiGiovanni, Middle East Editor of Newsweek and author of Ghosts by Daylight (Knopf)
“Remarkably, leaders in Eastern Europe and the Middle East have been able to find parallels in the pathways toward peace taken by former leaders from South Africa, Argentina, and many other countries. This book tells the story, with gorgeous photographs and compelling narrative.” – Jessica Stern, author of Denial: A Memoir of Terror and fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health.
“A quiet, gentle, yet epic gathering of facts and thought and ideas and pleas about the equality of mankind and how we sill never find peace if we forego the ability to truly communicate.” – Grady Harp, Amazon.com Hall of Fame/top 50 reviewer
“This fascinating and beautifully produced book is a fitting tribute to the outstanding programs of Beyond Conflict. It captures the essence of twenty years of great achievement. I recommend it for anyone with an interest in foreign policy and especially in assisting nations in transition to democracy.” – Richard Goldstone, former South African judge and first chief prosecutor of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda
“Beyond Conflict is an NGO animated by a simple and brilliant premise: seemingly intractable hatreds can be alleviated when adversaries are exposed to other former enemies who were able to emerge from war. Tim Phillips and his partners have been arranging such dramatic meetings for twenty years in some of the most violent and desperate corners of the globe. The remarkable results of these efforts are beautifully documented in this book, which contains essays by a variety of senior peacemakers. The essays are moving, the photography breathtaking, and most importantly, the idea actually works. The book is a must for anyone interested in the theory or practice of Conflict Resolution.” – Nir Eisikovits Ph.D., LLB
“As a Senior Fellow at the Harvard Negotiation Project, with three decades of working in conflicts in the former Soviet Union, Middle East and Africa, I have had experience in using the shared experience methodology detailed in this inspiring book. This book documents how Tim Phillips and his colleagues have pioneered and developed the shared experience methodology as a distinctive approach with proven results and great promise for current and future conflicts. I believe this approach should be taught in conflict resolution and negotiation courses alongside the currently dominant interest-based and needs-based approaches.
This book is based on the premise that, on a biological, emotional and psychological level, humans have many of the same response mechanisms to trauma and threat, specifically to the humiliating, dehumanizing and terrifying experience of life in conditions of dictatorship and violent conflict. Based on this premise of how humans are wired, the book gives an inspiring and compelling account of the power of two core principles in dealing with the world’s most challenging conflicts. First, people can learn by listening first-hand to the deeply personal experience of others who have successfully moved through fear, repression and violent conflict and, second, that this can help them change—it can speed the process of both internal and societal change.
This book addresses the human dimension of conflict directly in remarkable depth—how to convene the right people and ask the right questions to facilitate the “psychological shifts” that are critical to conflict transformation. The dozens of dialogues organized by Beyond Conflict have helped leaders in current conflicts rise to their own leadership challenge by creating the opportunity for them to meet and listen to individuals who took the personal and political risks necessary for peace, stability and national reconciliation. The six leaders profiled in the book all took those risks. Beyond Conflict’s board has included individuals who are emblematic of courageous risk-taking for nonviolent, inclusive conflict transformation: Mandela, Havel, Gorbachev and many others.
Beyond Conflict continues to study and test its basic premise, leading some fascinating groundbreaking work on how our brain processes conflict, showing that—given all our very real differences in culture, politics, race, ethnicity and religion—we all still process fear, threat and exclusion in the same way. I have been deeply inspired by this book.” – Bruce J. Allen, Harvard Law School
Book

In the Brain, Dislike and Dehumanization Are Not the Same Thing

Reviews: